8.30.2014

Esther Hobart Morris

first US female Justice of the Peace

First Woman Justice of the Peace in America

Wyoming can claim many firsts for women: the right to vote, the first woman governor, and the first woman judge in American history, Esther Hobart Morris. At the time of her appointment as Justice of the Peace, Morris was 59 years old. Although widely celebrated as a hero of the early suffragist movement, she spent the first 55 years of her life living quietly in New York state and Illinois.

Early Years
Esther Hobart was born August 6, 1814 in Tioga County, New York. Orphaned as a young girl, she served as an apprentice to a seamstress and ran a millinery business out of her grandparents' home. She was a successful businesswoman by her early 20s. As a young woman, Esther spoke out against slavery, and supported women's right to organize societies that would abolish slavery.

8.17.2014

Mary Treat

19th century botanist and entomologist

Pioneer Scientist and Author

Mary Treat was a naturalist from New Jersey and a major contributor to many scientific developments of the nineteenth century. She is most well known for her extensive work in botany and entomology. Four species of plants and insects were named after her. She also corresponded with Charles Darwin. Treat was a pioneer in several areas of natural sciences.

Image: Mary Treat in 1904

Mary Lua Adelia Davis was born September 7, 1830 in Trumansburg, New York. Her parents were Isaac Davis, a Methodist minister, and Eliza (English) Davis and she had one sister, Nellie. In 1839 her family moved to Ohio where she attended public school and, for a short while, a private girls' academy.

8.08.2014

First Women Magazine Editors

magazine for which Sarah Josepha Hale served as editor for 40 years

Early Women Magazine Editors: Few and Far Between

Ladies' Magazine (1827-1836) was the first American magazine edited by a woman: Sarah Josepha Hale. In 1837 it merged with Lady's Book and Magazine to become Godey's Lady's Book. Hale moved from Boston to Philadelphia to edit the new magazine. She did not regret the move.

Image: 1849 Cover of Godey's Lady's Book
Sarah Josepha Hale, Editor

For the most part, women's magazines of the nineteenth century focused on concerns seen as appropriate to woman's sphere. Advertisers found the traditional home-centered woman to be an excellent customer for their clothing, cosmetics and household products; therefore, they preferred to patronize publications that would not lead women to question their place in society.